The National Academy of Medicine

The National Academies provide expert advice to the U.S. government on issues of science, health, and engineering and, today, comprise three private, nonprofit institutions: The National Academy of Sciences (NAS), National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and National Academy of Medicine (NAM). The NAM is the newest of these, established in 1970 originally under the name Institute of Medicine (IOM).

Membership to the Academies is considered one of the highest honors bestowed to a U.S. scientist. Below is a list of the many NIH scientists, past and present, elected to the NAM. Click to view our list of NAS members and NAE members.

Current NIH scientists elected to the NAM (year of election):

  • Peter L. Choyke (2020). For pioneering advances in the imaging of prostate cancer that have enabled accurate localization of clinically significant tumors. His work has allowed more accurate and efficient biopsies as well as focal therapies that cause fewer side effects than conventional therapies.

  • Cynthia E. Dunbar (2020). For leading pioneering genetic marking and therapy trials targeting hematopoietic stem cells, and developing uniquely predictive non-human primate models to successfully improve the safety and efficiency of various gene therapies as well as gain insights into hematopoiesis and immunology.

  • Heinz Feldmann (2020). For leading the development of the vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccine platform that resulted in the first Ebola vaccine. His mobile diagnostic laboratory for public health and biodefense emergencies is now used by the World Health Organization. 

  • Louis M. Staudt (2020). For demonstrating that genetic profiling can distinguish lymphoma subtypes, predict patient survival, and individualize therapy, thus playing a key role in launching the era of cancer precision medicine. He devised loss-of-function genetic screens for essential cancer genes, thereby enabling effective targeted therapies for molecular subtypes of lymphoma.

  • Carlos Alberto Zarate Jr. (2020). For demonstrating that a single ketamine infusion has rapid, robust, and relatively sustained antidepressant effects in individuals with treatment-resistant depression and bipolar depression, in addition to significant anti-suicidal and anti-anhedonic effects. Identifying ketamine as a rapid-acting antidepressant and anti-suicidal ideation agent was a paradigm shift in psychiatry.

  • Michael Lenardo (2019). For the discoveries of molecular mechanisms of immunological tolerance, seminal work on programmed cell death, defining new inherited genetic diseases of immunity, and developing targeted therapies that have saved the lives of children suffering from certain of these devastating diseases.

  • Luigi D. Notarangelo (2019). For making seminal discoveries in the characterization of the molecular and cellular bases of several forms of primary immune deficiencies, and for his leadership role in the creation of networks of centers that care for patients with these disorders, aiming to improve diagnosis and treatment.

  • Andre Nussenzweig (2019). For making seminal discoveries that speak to how cells maintain their own genome stability, allow chromosome fragility, and license leukemogenesis at the hands of aberrant DNA repair.

  • Julie Segre (2019). For pioneering whole-genome sequencing to track the transmission of fully antibiotic resistant Gram-negative bacterium in the midst of a deadly hospital outbreak.

  • Yasmine Belkaid (2018). For defining fundamental mechanisms that regulate tissue immunity and uncovered key roles for the commensal microbiota and dietary factors in the maintenance of tissue immunity and protection to pathogens.

  • William Gahl (2018). For contributions that include creating the Undiagnosed Diseases Program within intramural NIH to meld individualized patient care with next-generation sequencing and to provide insights into new mechanisms of disease; spearheading expansion to the national Undiagnosed Diseases Network and the Undiagnosed Disease Network International; and championing the sharing of genetic databases and best practices.

  • Joshua Gordon (2018). For research demonstrating how distant brain regions cooperate and coordinate their activity in order to guide behavior, and how this coordination is disrupted in experimental systems relevant to psychiatric disorders.

  • Steve Holland (2018). For distinguished achievements in primary immunodeficiencies and infectious diseases, including the recognition, treatment, genomic identification, and cure of previously unexplained diseases as well as the identification and characterization of novel pathogens in those diseases.

  • Ellen Leibenluft (2018). For highlighting the need to carefully evaluate children who may have bipolar disorder; identifying chronic irritability, a new clinical problem which differs from pediatric bipolar disorder; and pioneering the use of cognitive neuroscience to address fundamental clinical questions on nosology and treatment of pediatric mental disorders.

  • Charles Rotimi (2018). For groundbreaking research in African and African ancestry populations, providing new insights into the genetic and environmental contributors to a variety of important clinical conditions, as well as health disparities locally and globally.

  • Christine Grady (2017)

  • George F. Koob (2017)

  • John R. Mascola (2017)

  • Karen Berman (2016)

  • Leslie G. Biesecker (2016)

  • T. Jake Liang (2016)

  • Christopher Austin (2015)

  • Walter Koroshetz (2015)

  • John J. O’Shea (2014)

  • Diana Bianchi (2013)
  • Ronald Germain (2013)

  • Warren Leonard (2013)

  • Daniel Pine (2013)
  • Dan Kastner (2012)

  • Linda Birnbaum (2010)

  • Ira Pastan (2010)

  • Thomas Wellems (2010)

  • Carl Wu (2010)

  • Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz (2009)

  • Story Landis (2009)

  • Griffin Rodgers (2009)

  • Elaine Jaffe (2008)

  • Marston Linehan (2008)

  • Bruce Baum (2007)

  • Leighton Chan (2007)

  • Gary H. Gibbons (2007)

  • James M. Ostell (2007)

  • Roberto Romero (2007)

  • H. Clifford Lane (2006)

  • Alan DeCherney (2004)

  • Thomas Quinn (2004)

  • Roger Glass (2003)

  • Michael Gottesman (2003)

  • Douglas Lowy (2003)

  • Harvey Alter (2002)

  • Lawrence Tabak (2002)

  • Kathryn Zoon (2002)

  • Patricia Flatley Brennan (2001)

  • Eliseo Perez-Stable (2001)

  • Nora Volkow (2000)

  • Kenneth Fischbeck (1999)

  • Richard Hodes (1999)

  • Johanna T. Dwyer (1998)

  • Robert Wurtz (1997)

  • Mitchell Gail (1996)

  • John Gallin (1996)

  • Vivian Pinn (1995)

  • Clement J. McDonald (1994)

  • Florence Haseltine (1993)

  • Judith Rapoport (1993)

  • Thomas Waldmann (1992)

  • Joseph Fraumeni (1992)

  • Francis Collins (1991)

  • Louis Miller (1991)

  • Mortimer Mishkin (1990)

  • Anthony Fauci (1987)

  • Steven Rosenberg (1987)

  • Samuel A. Wells, Jr. (1987)

Partial list of former NIH scientists elected to the IOM/NAM (alphabetical):

  • Julius Axelrod (1980)

  • Jeremy Berg (2010)

  • Antonello Bonci (2016)

  • Roscoe O. Brady (1985)

  • Samuel Broder (1993)

  • Dennis Charney (2000)

  • George Chrousos (2010)

  • Ezekiel Emmanuel (2004)

  • Donald Fredrickson (1971)

  • Maria Freire (2008)

  • Naomi Lynn Gerber (2008)

  • Harold Ginsberg (1981)

  • Frederick Goodwin (1985)

  • Enoch Gordis (1988)

  • Patricia Grady (1999)

  • Alan Guttmacher (2004)

  • Betsy Humphreys (1999)

  • Thomas Insel (2003)

  • Robert Kaplan (2005)

  • Stephen Katz (1992)

  • Ruth Kirschstein (1983)

  • Claude Klee (1992)

  • Richard Krause (1981)

  • Carl Kupfer (1983)

  • Philip Leder (1979)

  • Donald Lindberg (1985)

  • David Lipman (2000)

  • Husseini Manji (2008)

  • Donald Mattison (2000)

  • Gary Nabel (1998)

  • John Niederhuber (2008)

  • Marshall Nirenberg (1971)

  • William Paul (1990)

  • Roderic I. Pettigrew (NAM 2007 and NAE 2010)

  • Alan Rabson (1987)

  • Matilda White Riley (1979)

  • John Robbins (1993)

  • John Seal (1984)

  • Paul Sieving (2006)

  • Louis Sokoloff (1997)

  • Leslie Ungerleider (2001)

  • Hannah A. Valantine (2020)

  • Harold Varmus (1991)

  • Daniel Weinberger (1999)

  • Flossie Wong-Staal (1994)