Steven M. Holland, M.D.

NIH Distinguished Investigator

Immunopathogenesis Section

NIAID/DIR

4 Memorial Drive, Room 228B
Bethesda, MD 20814

301-402-7684

sholland@niaid.nih.gov

Research Topics

The Immunopathogenesis Section therapeutic and research programs take a fully integrated approach to infectious disease, incorporating the molecular genetics of the host and the pathogen as well as mechanisms of pathogenesis that allow the development and study of novel therapeutics. The integrated bench-to-bedside model is intrinsic to the Immunopathogenesis Section approach and is reflected in the close involvement of trainees (both M.D. and Ph.D.) in laboratory work and in the clinical appreciation of disease, which together add new insights into mechanisms of action and avenues of therapy. New protocols inCoccidioides infections and pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections are in progress.

Biography

Dr. Holland received his M.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1983, where he stayed as a resident in internal medicine, assistant chief of service in medicine, and fellow in infectious diseases. He came to the National Institutes of Health in 1989 as a National Research Council fellow in the Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, working on transcriptional regulation of HIV. In 1991, Dr. Holland joined the Laboratory of Host Defenses, shifting his research to the host side, with a focus on phagocyte defects and their associated infections. His work centered on the pathogenesis and management of chronic granulomatous disease, as well as other congenital immune defects affecting phagocytes, including those predisposing to mycobacterial diseases. He was chief of LCID from 2004 to 2016 and was selected as DIR director in 2016.

Selected Publications

  1. Zerbe CS, Marciano BE, Katial RK, Santos CB, Adamo N, Hsu AP, Hanks ME, Darnell DN, Quezado MM, Frein C, Barnhart LA, Anderson VL, Uzel G, Freeman AF, Lisco A, Nath A, Major EO, Sampaio EP, Holland SM. Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy in Primary Immune Deficiencies: Stat1 Gain of Function and Review of the Literature. Clin Infect Dis. 2016;62(8):986-94.

  2. Chandrasekaran P, Zimmerman O, Paulson M, Sampaio EP, Freeman AF, Sowerwine KJ, Hurt D, Alc√°ntara-Montiel JC, Hsu AP, Holland SM. Distinct mutations at the same positions of STAT3 cause either loss or gain of function. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016;138(4):1222-1224.e2.

  3. Cohen JI, Dropulic L, Hsu AP, Zerbe CS, Krogmann T, Dowdell K, Hornung RL, Lovell J, Hardy N, Hickstein D, Cowen EW, Calvo KR, Pittaluga S, Holland SM. Association of GATA2 Deficiency With Severe Primary Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Infection and EBV-associated Cancers. Clin Infect Dis. 2016;63(1):41-7.

  4. Hsu AP, West RR, Calvo KR, Cuellar-Rodriguez J, Parta M, Kelly SJ, Ganson NJ, Hershfield MS, Holland SM, Hickstein DD. Adenosine deaminase type 2 deficiency masquerading as GATA2 deficiency: Successful hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2016;138(2):628-630.e2.

  5. Moutsopoulos NM, Zerbe CS, Wild T, Dutzan N, Brenchley L, DiPasquale G, Uzel G, Axelrod KC, Lisco A, Notarangelo LD, Hajishengallis G, Notarangelo LD, Holland SM. Interleukin-12 and Interleukin-23 Blockade in Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type 1. N Engl J Med. 2017;376(12):1141-1146.


This page was last updated on January 28th, 2017