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Events

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) campuses host a variety of events that inform, challenge, and unite the biomedical research community. IRP investigators lead or participate in many of these events, and they regularly present their work at scientific conferences at the NIH and around the world. We invite you to learn about (and possibly join us in) some of our upcoming events. Unless otherwise noted, times listed are Eastern Standard Time (EST).

Tuesday, June 27, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm

Lister Hill Auditorium, National Library of Medicine (Bldg. 38A)

Yes, that Harry Potter. The National Library of Medicine’s History of Medicine Division is hosting two special events, collectively titled “Celebrating 20 Years of Harry Potter”. Join us first for “A Look into the Pensieve: Reflections on Harry Potter at Twenty Years,” by Elizabeth Bland, Curator of the Library’s exhibition "Harry Potter’s World" and independent writer and illustrator. The celebration will also include a special display of the 15th, 16th, and 17th century books that influenced the Harry Potter series along with the six-banner traveling exhibition, "Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine". Visit this special exhibition in the History of Medicine Reading Room, June 26 – 30, 2017.

Wednesday, June 28, 2017, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm (reception to follow)

Masur Auditorium, NIH Clinical Center (Bldg. 10)

Join us for the final WALS of the 2016 - 2017 season, "Word processor for the genome: technologies for improving our understanding and treatment of diseases" by Feng Zhang, Ph.D., Core Member and Associate Professor for the Departments of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Biological Engineering in the Broad Institute of MIT.

From the speaker: Our research focuses on the development and application of novel molecular technologies for studying the nervous system. Given the complexity of the brain, it is important to develop both precise perturbation as well as quantitative readout methodologies so that we can systematically reverse-engineer how the brain is functionally organized. So far my work has focused on the development of optogenetics technologies for controlling neural activity with high temporal, spatial, and cell-type specificity; and, more recently, genome engineering technologies based on CRISPR-Cas systems to allow precise alteration or modulation of the mammalian genome to unravel genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying nervous system function and disease.

The NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series, colloquially known as WALS, is the highest-profile lecture program at the NIH.  Lectures occur on most Wednesdays from September through June from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. in Masur Auditorium, Building 10 on the NIH Bethesda campus.

Thursday, June 29, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm

Lister Hill Auditorium, National Library of Medicine (Bldg. 38A)

Yes, that Harry Potter. The National Library of Medicine’s History of Medicine Division is hosting two special event, collectively titled “Celebrating 20 Years of Harry Potter,” on June 27 and June 29. Join us for “Monsters in the Stacks: How Harry Potter Came to NLM,” by Stephen Greenberg, Ph.D., Head of Rare Books & Early Manuscripts in the NLM History of Medicine Division. The celebration will also include a special display of the 15th, 16th, and 17th century books that influenced the Harry Potter series along with the six-banner traveling exhibition, "Harry Potter’s World: Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine". Visit this special exhibition in the History of Medicine Reading Room, June 26 – 30, 2017.

Thursday, July 6, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Lipsett Amphitheater, NIH Clinical Center (Bldg. 10)

Join us for "Predictive Genomic Medicine: Reversing the Paradigm" by Leslie G. Biesecker, M.D., part of the 2016-2017 DIR Genome Seminar Series. Dr. Biesecker is the Chief & Senior Investigator of the Medical Genomics and Metabolic Genetics Branch in the Division of Intramural Research at the National Human Genome Research Institute. This seminar is free and open to the public.

Dr. Biesecker's research focuses on understanding the relationship of genomic variation to health and disease. Dr. Biesecker's group studies several multiple anomaly syndromes, including Pallister-Hall syndrome, Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome, McKusick-Kaufman syndrome, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, oral-facial-digital syndrome, Lenz microphthalmia syndrome, Proteus syndrome and non-syndromic polydactyly. The Human Development Section has been recognized as an international leader in finding novel diagnostic and management approaches to these disorders, many of which are extremely rare. The goals of his research program are to improve the medical care of patients affected by these disorders, provide generalized knowledge about the broad field of genetic disease and better understand basic mechanisms of normal and abnormal human development and physiology.

Thursday, July 13, 2017, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Room 1A51/1A59, Bldg. 49

The Trans-NIH GeroScience Interest Group (GSIG) cordially invites you to its summer seminar, “Hematopoietic Stem Cells Aging – Mechanisms, Consequences and Interventions". The speaker is Emmanuelle Passegué, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Genetics and Development at the Columbia University Medical Center and Director of the Columbia Stem Cell Initiative (CSCI) in New York. She is widely recognized for her expertise on hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) biology. Her research over the past 10-years has focused on understanding the cellular and molecular processes controlling HSC activity during homeostasis, and addressing how these regulations are changed in myeloid malignancies and physiological aging. Her laboratory employs a variety of cross-disciplinary approaches using mouse models and human patient samples to identify genetic and/or molecular pathways as therapeutic targets to treat human diseases. Current projects investigate the role of apoptosis, autophagy, immune regulations, DNA repair mechanisms, and changes in the bone marrow niche microenvironment in HSC function in normal, stress, leukemic and aging conditions.

Thursday, August 3, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm

Lipsett Amphitheater, NIH Clinical Center (Bldg. 10)

William Gahl, M.D., Ph.D., clinical director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and the Undiagnosed Diseases Program, will present a summer lecture titled “The NIH Undiagnosed Diseases Program and Network: Diagnosis and Discovery” as part of the 2016-2017 DIR Genome Seminar Series. This seminar is free and open to the public.

The immensely successful and NIH-intramural initiated Undiagnosed Diseases Program (UDP) is now part of the Undiagnosed Disease Network (UDN), an NIH Common Fund initiative that focuses on the most puzzling medical cases referred to the NIH Clinical Center. It was organized by NHGRI, the NIH Office of Rare Diseases Research (ORDR) and the NIH Clinical Center. Many medical specialties from other NIH research centers and institutes contribute the expertise needed to conduct the program, including endocrinology, immunology, oncology, dermatology, dentistry, cardiology and genetics, among the dozens of participating senior attending physicians. Its purpose is to bring together clinical and research experts from across the United States to solve the most challenging medical mysteries using advanced technologies. 

Monday, August 7, 2017, 12:00 pm to Tuesday, August 8, 2017, 3:15 pm

Ruth Kirschstein Auditorium, Natcher Building (Bldg. 45)

The National Institute of Nursing Research presents a summit, “The Science of Caregiving: Bringing Voices Together”. NINR and its partners invite you to this summit to provide perspectives across the spectrum of caregiving, including the importance of caregiving across the lifespan as well as current and future directions for research to improve the health of patients and caregivers. The keynote speaker is Judy Woodruff of PBS NewsHour. In addition, the Directors of Ceremonies for the event are Gail Hunt of the National Alliance for Caregiving on August 7 and Dr. Laura Gitlin of the Center for Innovative Care in Aging at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing on August 8.  The event will bring together an audience of researchers, advocates, healthcare providers, educators, and others interested in the science of caregiving.

This event is free but space is limited and registration is required. NINR’s partners for this event include the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute on Aging, the Eunice Kennedy Shiver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences’ Office of Rare Diseases Research, the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, the NIHOffice of Disease Prevention, and the NIH Office of Research on Women's Health.

Wednesday, September 6, 2017, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm

Lipsett Amphitheater, NIH Clinical Center (Bldg. 10)

Join us for the 14th Annual Jeffrey M. Trent Lecture. The 2017 Trent Lecture will be “Bringing Genomics to the Pediatric Oncology Clinic: Diagnosis, Treatment Selection and Rational Clinical Trial Design” by Katherine Janeway, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Sr. Physician and Director Solid Tumor Service, Pediatric Oncology, at the Dana-Farber / Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center.

Wednesday, September 27, 2017 to Thursday, September 28, 2017

Natcher Conference Center (Bldg. 45)

Join us for the 2017 NHLBI Cardiovascular Regenerative Medicine Symposium. The event will bring together experts in stem cell biology, cardiovascular development, translational cardiovascular stem cell biology, endogenous heart regeneration and new technologies and models. The emphasis will again be on recent discoveries and trends. We will examine the challenges and critical questions that require answers as the field moves forward to clinical applications. The Symposium’s goals are to help the science and field move forward, to find consensus regarding the translation of stem cell biology and research into a clinical setting, and to inspire participants in their own work. Topic areas are: Stem Cell Biology; Cardiovascular Development; Translational Cardiovascluar Stem Cell Biology; Endogenous Heart Regeneration; and New Technologies and Models. Register online.