Skip to main content
 

Events

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) campuses host a variety of events that inform, challenge, and unite the biomedical research community. IRP investigators lead or participate in many of these events, and they regularly present their work at scientific conferences at the NIH and around the world. We invite you to learn about (and possibly join us in) some of our upcoming events. Unless otherwise noted, times listed are Eastern Standard Time (EST).

Wednesday, December 7, 2016, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm (reception to follow)

Masur Auditorium, NIH Clinical Center (Bldg. 10)

Join us for “Adventures in brain plasticity: from memory palaces to soulcycle,” by Wendy A. Suzuki, Professor of Neural Science and Psychology at New York University.

About the speaker: Can exercise improve brain function? If so, how? These are the questions that underlie this arm of the research in the Suzuki lab. Our long term goal is to understand the neural mechanisms underlying these exercise-related changes in cognitive performance. What is the most effective exercise “prescription” that can enhances learning, memory and attention in school/university settings? Can this same prescription also be used to help improve cognitive functions in the wide range of different neurological disease states where cognition and memory are affected like Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease as well as normal human aging? Current studies in healthy adults as well as patients with traumatic brain injury and addiction are currently the focus of studies in the lab.”

The NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series, colloquially known as WALS, is the highest-profile lecture program at the NIH. Lectures occur on most Wednesdays from September through June from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. in Masur Auditorium, Building 10 on the NIH Bethesda campus. The next WALS talk is on December 15, “Using human stem cells to understand and treat diabetes,” by Douglas Melton, Ph.D., Harvard University.  Refer to https://oir.nih.gov/wals for the full 2016–2017 schedule.

Friday, December 9, 2016, 8:00 am to 5:00 pm

Ground Floor Presentation Rooms, Bldg 35

Please join us for the 2016 NIH Thymus Symposium, presented by the Center of Excellence in Immunology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, and the NIH-FDA Cytokine Interest Group. The symposium is aimed to highlight recent advances in our understanding of thymus biology and T cell differentiation. The inaugural Thymus Symposium was held in May 2012 to great success. Since then, tremendous progress has been made in thymus biology and thymic T cell differentiation, so that a venue to showcase and discuss these findings has been long overdue. The 2016 NCI Thymus Symposium aims to provide a forum that brings together NIH intramural scientists and world-class thymus immunologists to gather new insights into the findings and discuss their implications. This one-day symposium is open to everyone who is interested in the immunological aspects of thymus biology. For more information, see https://ncifrederick.cancer.gov/Events/thymus.

Thursday, December 15, 2016, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm

Lipsett Amphitheater, NIH Clinical Center (Bldg. 10)

The NHGRI will host a seminar by Jennifer Gardy, Chair in Public Health Genomics at the School of Population & Public Health, University of British Columbia. The talk is titled “The Story of an Outbreak: Tracking Tuberculosis in British Columbia with Genomics.”  Gardy joined the BC Centre for Disease Control in 2009, where she worked on genome epidemiology, a new scientific field of inquiry. She also is a host of CBC’s The Nature of Things.

Thursday, December 15, 2016, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm (reception to follow)

Masur Auditorium, NIH Clinical Center (Bldg. 10)

Join us for "Using human stem cells to understand and treat diabetes" by Douglas Melton, Ph.D., Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Co-Director of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Professor at Harvard University.

From the speaker: We study how the pancreas normally develops and use that information to grow and develop pancreatic cells (Islets of Langerhans). Our laboratory focuses on the directed differentiation of stem cells to create functional pancreatic beta cells that can be used for research on the cause(s) of diabetes as well as exploring the use of stem cell-derived islets for transplantation.

The NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series, colloquially known as WALS, is the highest-profile lecture program at the NIH. Lectures occur on most Wednesdays from September through June from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. in Masur Auditorium, Building 10 on the NIH Bethesda campus. Refer to https://oir.nih.gov/wals for the full 2016–2017 schedule.

Wednesday, January 11, 2017, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm (reception to follow)

Join us for "Leptin and the neural circuit regulation food intake and glucose metabolism" by Jeffrey Friedman, M.D., Ph.D., Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Professor at The Rockefeller University.

Jeffrey Friedman studies the molecular mechanisms that regulate food intake and body weight. Genetic studies in mice led to the identification of leptin, a hormone made by fat tissue, that plays a key role in regulating weight. Current studies explore the mechanisms by which leptin controls feeding behavior and body weight. Studies to identify other key regulators are also under way.

The NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series, colloquially known as WALS, is the highest-profile lecture program at the NIH. Lectures occur on most Wednesdays from September through June from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. in Masur Auditorium, Building 10 on the NIH Bethesda campus. Refer to https://oir.nih.gov/wals for the full 2016–2017 schedule.