Skip to main content
 

Events

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) campuses host a variety of events that inform, challenge, and unite the biomedical research community. IRP investigators lead or participate in many of these events, and they regularly present their work at scientific conferences at the NIH and around the world. We invite you to learn about (and possibly join us in) some of our upcoming events. Unless otherwise noted, times listed are Eastern Standard Time (EST).

Wednesday, May 3, 2017, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm (reception to follow)

Masur Auditorium, NIH Clinical Center (Bldg. 10)

Join us for the Robert S. Gordon, Jr. Lecture, "The changing epidemiology of HPV and cervical cancer: from etiology, to validation of prevention methods, to dissemination" by Mark Schiffman, M.D., M.P.H., Senior Investigator at the NCI-DCEG.

Over three decades of studies moving from etiology to preventive methods research to guidelines development, Dr. Schiffman has learned some broad lessons about the strengths and weaknesses of epidemiology that he will describe.

He joined the Clinical Genetics Branch in October 2009 to study intensively why HPV is such a powerful carcinogenic exposure, akin to an acquired genetic trait with high penetrance for a cancer phenotype. The main studies in which Dr. Schiffman played a major role in the past 5 years, listed chronologically, include: The Portland Kaiser Cohort; the Taiwan Cohort Study; the Guanacaste Natural History Study; the ASCUS-LSIL Triage Study (ALTS); the Study to Understand Cervical Cancer Early Endpoints and Determinants (SUCCEED/Biopsy); the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (CVT); the Persistence and Progression (PaP) Study; and Nigeria Project Itoju. These studies overall have related HPV status to outcome for more than 100,000 women.

The NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series, colloquially known as WALS, is the highest-profile lecture program at the NIH.  Lectures occur on most Wednesdays from September through June from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. in Masur Auditorium, Building 10 on the NIH Bethesda campus.

Thursday, May 4, 2017, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm (reception to follow)

Masur Auditorium, NIH Clinical Center (Bldg. 10)

Join us for the NIH Director's Lecture, "The molecular logic of synapse formation in the brain" by Thomas Christian Südhof, M.D., Avram Goldstein Professor at the Stanford School of Medicine.

Thomas Südhof is interested in how synapses form and function in the developing and adult brain. His work focuses on the role of synaptic cell-adhesion molecules in establishing synapses and shaping their properties, on pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms of membrane traffic, and on impairments in synapse formation and synaptic function in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. To address these questions, Südhof's laboratory employs a spectrum of approaches ranging from biophysical studies and physiological and behavioral investigations of mutant mice to analyses of human neurons.

The NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series, colloquially known as WALS, is the highest-profile lecture program at the NIH.  Lectures occur on most Wednesdays from September through June from 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. in Masur Auditorium, Building 10 on the NIH Bethesda campus.