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I am Intramural Blog

Medallions and Medicine

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Medallions and coins are both beautiful artwork and symbols of what achievements and people we value. These are some of the beautiful medallions and coins in the NIH History Office collection—and the stories that go with them.

Ebola Virus: Lessons from a Unique Survivor

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

There are new reports of an outbreak of Ebola virus disease in the Democratic Republic of Congo. This news comes just two years after international control efforts eventually contained an Ebola outbreak in West Africa, though before control was achieved, more than 11,000 people died—the largest known Ebola outbreak in human history. Many questions remain about why some people die from Ebola and others survive. Now, some answers are beginning to emerge thanks to a new detailed analysis of the immune responses of a unique Ebola survivor, a 34-year-old American health-care worker who was critically ill and cared for at the NIH Special Clinical Studies Unit in 2015.

Studying ADHD from Genes to the Brain Connectome

Tuesday, April 18, 2017
Contributed by an NIH clinical trial participant.

My 8-year-old nephew Luke has a sixth-grade reading level, while still in the third grade. Yet, he often struggles to finish his chores. He carries a timer in his backpack to keep himself on task. His school provides Luke with special assistance, including extra time for tests and repeated, detailed instruction. The challenges arise because Luke, like his mother Rebecca, has attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Developing Methods to Study the Brain's Visual System in Action

Friday, January 6, 2017

How does the brain know that what we’re looking at is standing still or moving? Dr. Robert H. Wurtz developed methods for studying the visual system, a technique now widely used for the study of higher brain functions, to find the answer to that question.

NIH researchers identify heritable brain connections linked to ADHD

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Illustration of the brain connectome in ADHD

In a new study of families affected by Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), National Institutes of Health (NIH) Intramural researchers have identified different connections in the brain that children may inherit from their parents and are linked to the disorder.

Four NIH IRP Researchers Elected to National Academy of Medicine

Monday, October 24, 2016

This year, members of the National Academy of Medicine elected four NIH Intramural researchers to their ranks, one of the highest honors in science. Learn a bit about each of their research and follow the links to their IRP profiles for more information.

Untangling Alzheimer’s Disease — Searching for Biomarkers in Exosomes

Thursday, September 29, 2016

What if we could diagnose risk for Alzheimer’s before symptoms appeared? To address the challenge, in the Laboratory of Neurosciences at the IRP, Dr. Maja Mustapic searches for Alzheimer’s biomarkers using liquid biopsies.

Untangling Alzheimer’s Disease — DNA Damage in Alzheimer’s

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Given that Alzheimer’s is such a complex disease with many causes and pathways, it is not surprising that the search for effective treatments has proven difficult. So I spoke with Drs. Yujun Hou and Hyundong Song, postdoctoral fellows in the IRP’s Laboratory of Molecular Gerontology at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) to learn more about their approaches to meeting the challenge.

Untangling Alzheimer’s Disease — September is Alzheimer’s Awareness Month

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Inspired by September’s World Alzheimer's Awareness Month and driven by my interest in cognitive aging and dementia, I'm asking my fellow IRP postdoctoral researchers about which approaches they believe hold promise for advancing our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease.

Exercise Releases Brain-Healthy Protein

Thursday, June 30, 2016

Five images of different exercise activities

We all know that exercise is important for a strong and healthy body. Less appreciated is that exercise seems also to be important for a strong and healthy mind, boosting memory and learning, while possibly delaying age-related cognitive decline. How is this so? Researchers have assembled a growing body of evidence that suggests skeletal muscle cells secrete proteins and other factors into the blood during exercise that have a regenerative effect on the brain.

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