Building a Partnership

Rwandan Physician Will Bring Home Lessons Learned at NIH

A physician from the Republic of Rwanda is spending a one-year fellowship at the NIH learning how to conduct clinical research and studying the epidemiology of diabetes and heart disease in African immigrant populations. He plans to use what he learns to help people in his home country.

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Ambition, and Lots of Fruit Flies

Mihaela “Ela” Serpe Explores Cell Signaling

Mihaela “Ela” Serpe credits Nobel laureate George Emil Palade for inspiring her in the 1990s when she was a research associate at the Institute of Cellular Biology and Pathology (Bucharest, Romania). Palade, who had discovered the ribosome, shared the 1974 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine with two others “for their discoveries concerning the structural and functional organization of the cell.”

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News Briefs

New HHS Secretary Tom Price makes his first official visit to NIH; new mobile germ-free facility at NIH will make sterile products; new NIH child-care center scheduled to be completed by summer. 

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Colleagues: Recently Tenured

Meet your recently tenured colleagues: Robert B. Best (NIDDK; pictured), Choonsik Lee (NCI-DCEG), Luigi Daniele Notarangelo (NIAID), Kumaran Ramamurthi (NCI-CCR), Jianxin Shi (NCI-DCEG)

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Research Briefs

NINR: BIOMARKER IN BLOOD MAY HELP PREDICT RECOVERY TIME FOR SPORTS CONCUSSIONS

CREDIT: PAUL BURNS/BLEND IMAGES/THINKSTOCK

NINR researchers have found that measuring concentrations of tau in the blood may provide an unbiased way to determine when it’s safe for athletes to return to play after a concussion.

 

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The Thymus: A Small Organ with Huge Immunological Impact

Special from the 2016 NCI Thymus Symposium

Scientists once thought that the thymus—a little organ in your upper chest—was a vestigial leftover without a major function. It wasn’t until the early 1960s that Australian immunologist Jacques Miller made an amazing discovery: The thymus is the place where T cells, the major effector cells of the immune system, are generated.

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Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Festival

Celebrating the Past, Looking to the Future

There is a broken pipeline between basic and applied behavioral and social sciences research,” NIH Associate Director for Behavioral and Social Sciences Research William Riley told the crowd that had gathered for the inaugural NIH Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Festival.

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From the Annals of NIH History

Hidden Figures in Paper Chromotography

Alma Levant Hayden (died 1967), a scientist in the then–National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic Diseases, is demonstrating a technique called paper chromatography to screen for steroid substances.

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The Training Page

FROM THE OFFICE OF INTRAMURAL TRAINING AND EDUCATION

Making the Most of Your NIH Experience

In the 21st century, successful scientists need strong communication skills. You must be able to teach in the research environment and perhaps in the classroom; you must collaborate effectively; and you must function well both as a manager and as a leader. Furthermore, you must understand the career-exploration process, the importance of networking, and effective job-search strategies.

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The SIG Beat: Flow Cytometry

NEWS FROM AND ABOUT THE SCIENTIFIC INTEREST GROUPS

Go with the Flow

Highlights from the Flow Cytometry Interest Group Winter Meeting

BY JACQUELINE MINEHART, NEI

These are innovative times in flow cytometry, a technology that simultaneously analyzes multiple characteristics of thousands of cells as they move through fluid and are excited by a light source.

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The SIG Beat: New SIGs

NEWS FROM AND ABOUT THE SCIENTIFIC INTEREST GROUPS

Two new SIGs: Psychoneuroendocrinology Scientific Interest Group; Deep Learning in Medical Imaging and Behavior Interest Group

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Announcements

Lectures, meetings, events, and deadlines

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