Announcements

MUSIC EVENTS

  • NIH Philharmonia: Tuesday, June 06, 2017, Noon–1:00 p.m.; Atrium, Building 10 (Clinical Center)
  • Six Degree Singers; Thursday, June 29, 2017, 12:30–1:30 p.m.; Atrium, Building 10 (Clinical Center)

NEUROSCIENCE SEMINAR SERIES

May 15: Carlos D. Brody (Princeton), “On the Role of Rat Superior Colliculus in Cognitive Control”

May 22: Kristin Baldwin (The Scripps Research Institute, San Diego), “Defining and Generating Neuronal Diversity Using Reprogramming”

June 05: Yishi Jin (University of California, San Diego), “Mechanisms of Synapse Formation and Axon Regeneration”

June 12: Istvan Katona (Institute of Experimental Medicine of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), “Cell-type-specific STORM Superresolution Imaging of Synaptic Cannabinoid Signaling”

June 19: Thomas Euler (University of Tübingen), “What the Mouse’s Eye Tells the Mouse’s Brain”


THE HIDDEN SECRETS OF SMALL GENES

  • Anita Roberts Lecture
  • Tuesday, May 16, 2017, 1:00–2:00 p.m.
  • Lipsett Amphitheater (Building 10)
  • Videocast URL: http://videocast.nih.gov

NICHD’s Associate Scientific Director Gisela Storz will be the featured speaker at the 2017 Anita Roberts Lecture. Storz’s research focuses on identification and characterization of small and often overlooked classes of biological molecules such as regulatory RNAs in Escherichia coli and proteins of fewer than 50 amino acids. Storz is a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and National Academy of Sciences, and she received the American Society for Microbiology Eli Lilly Award in 2000. The lecture is open to all and will be followed by a reception to talk with Storz about career issues for women in science. The Anita B. Roberts Lecture Series: Distinguished Women Scientists at NIH is sponsored by the NIH Women Scientist Advisors Committee, and it highlights outstanding research achievements of women scientists in the Intramural Research Program at NIH. Anita B. Roberts, who died in 2006, was chief of NCI’s Laboratory of Cell Regulation and Carcinogenesis from 1995 to 2006. Individuals with disabilities who need reasonable accommodations to participate should contact Margaret McBurney at 301-496-1921 and/or Federal Relay, 1-800-877-8339, five days before the lecture.


FROM THE JUNGLE TO THE SYNCHROTRON—SEVEN MILLENNIA OF DISCOVERING MEDICINES TARGETING G PROTEIN–COUPLED RECEPTORS

  • John Daly Lecture
  • Wednesday, May 17, 2017, 2:00–3:00 p.m.
  • Lipsett Amphitheater (Building 10)
  • Videocast URL: http://videocast.nih.gov
  • Special Instructions: To arrange sign language interpretation for an event go to the Office of Research Services’ Interpreting Service Requests web page at http://www.ors.od.nih.gov/pes/dats/interpret/pages/index.aspx.
  • Featured speaker: Fiona Marshall, founder, director, and chief scientific Officer, Heptares Therapeutics Ltd, Welwyn, Garden City

NIH PI DAY 2017 (RESCHEDULED FROM MARCH 14)

  • Thursday, May 18, 2017, 10:00 a.m.–4:30 p.m.; Building 10
  • 10:00–11:00 a.m.: Data Center Tours, Building 12A, Room 1100 (Registration required)
  • 11:00 a.m.–noon: PiCo Lightning Talks, Masur Auditorium (Building 10)
  • Noon–1:00 p.m.: Poster/Demo Session and Networking, FAES Terrace (Building 10)
  • 1:00–2:00 p.m.: Data Science Distinguished Seminar Series, Lecture by Bonnie Berger (Simons Professor of Mathematics at MIT) on “The Mathematics of Biomedical Data Science,” Masur Auditorium (Building 10)
  • 2:30–4:30 p.m.: Research Reproducibility Workshop, NIH Library Training Room (Building 10) (Registration required)
  • Website for more information: https://nihpiday.nih.gov/
  • Videocast URL: https://videocast.nih.gov
  • Special instructions: To arrange sign language interpretation for an event go to the Office of Research Services’ Interpreting Service Requests web page [https://www.ors.od.nih.gov/pes/dats/interpret/pages/index.aspx]

This event, originally planned for March 14, 2017 (Pi Day, 3/14), was rescheduled due to the Federal Government closure that occurred on that day. The goal of the NIH Pi Day Celebration is to increase awareness across the biomedical science community of the role that the quantitative sciences play in biomedical science.


GENOMICS AND HEALTH DISPARITIES LECTURE SERIES

The featured speaker will be Mark Cullen (director, Stanford Center for Population Health Science, and professor of medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine). Prior to his recruitment to Stanford, Cullen was a professor of medicine and public health and director of the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program at Yale University School of Medicine. Early in his career, he introduced concepts of clinical epidemiology into occupational and environmental medicine as a counterpart to the prevailing approaches of population epidemiology and animal toxicology. Early research interests included the biologic effects of lead, beryllium, solvents, and asbestos. As an outgrowth of his asbestos work, he was a co–principal investigator on the CARET trial, which examined the effects of vitamin A and beta carotene on the incidence of lung cancer in a high-risk population. In the mid-1990s he initiated a large collaborative project on occupational asthma, integrating mechanistic, clinical, and epidemiological components. The lecture series was created to enhance opportunities for dialogue about how innovations in genomics research and technology can affect health disparities. Topics range from basic science to translational research.


POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY, PRODUCTIVITY, AND THE SCIENCE OF HAPPINESS

The DDM Seminar Series offers the NIH community engaging presentations that provide meaningful insights into leadership and management concepts, challenges, and solutions. The seminars provide NIH employees the opportunity to advance their knowledge of best practices in a variety of leadership and management issues. Shawn Achor, the featured speaker, is one of the world’s leading experts on the connection between happiness and success. His research made the cover of Harvard Business Review, and he has lectured in more than 50 countries on resilience, optimism, and the power of a positive mind.


SAFETY, HEALTH, AND WELLNESS DAY

Everyone is welcome to participate in the activities and learn about safety, health, and wellness opportunities at the NIH. There will be more than 50 exhibitors, free health screenings, Recreation and Welfare (R&W) farmers market, elder and adult dependent care resources, R&W fitness activities, and much more. Food trucks and a dining tent will be available in parking lot 10H near the south entrance to the Clinical Center.


WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON LECTURES (WALS)

The NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series (WALS) brings the world’s best scientific investigators to your doorstep, and the upcoming 2016–2017 season is no exception. 

May 17: Roberto Kolter (Harvard Medical School), Brave New World: Recent Evolution of an Insect-transmitted Pathogen”

May 24: Stephen J. Elledge (Harvard Medical School), “How Aneuploidy Drives Cancer”

May 31: Patrick S. Moore (University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute), George Koury Lecture, “Thinking about Cancer as an Infectious Disease”

June 7: Louise D. McCullough (University of Texas Health Center), “Translational Stroke Research”

Tuesday, June 13 (2:00-3:00 p.m.): Atul Gawande (surgeon, writer, and public health researcher; Harvard Medical School)

June 14: Ken Ramos (University of Arizona), “Repetitive DNA Sequences in Health and Disease: Gift Wrappings for Precision Medicine”

June 21: Dinshaw J. Patel (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center), “Structural Biology of Gene, Epigenetic, and Immune Regulation”

June 28: Feng Zhang (The Broad Institute), “Word Processor for the Genome: Technologies for Improving Our Understanding and Treatment of Diseases”


REGISTRATION NOW OPEN FOR UPCOMING OSP WORKSHOP NIH GUIDELINES: HONORING THE PAST, CHARTING THE FUTURE

July 18 -19, 2017

  • Tuesday—Wednesday, July 18-19
  • Conference Room 508/509, 5635 Fishers Lane , Bethesda, Maryland 20892
  • Workshop website

In honor of the recent 40th anniversary of the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecules (NIH Guidelines) as well as the emergence of new technologies in the life sciences, it is an opportune time to examine the current biosafety oversight framework, and discuss the future direction of biosafety oversight. In the decades since scientists gathered at Asilomar, there has been considerable evolution in molecular biology, our understanding of risk and safety, and biosafety oversight. While recombinant DNA has become ubiquitous, new emerging technologies—ranging from new genome editing tools to novel RNA applications—are presenting interesting challenges to our current biosafety framework.

With this in mind, the NIH Office of Science Policy will be hosting an upcoming workshop that will ask, if the Asilomar Conference were held today, what would the NIH Guidelines look like? Where would they fit within the current policy and regulatory landscape? What would be the role of the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC)?

This workshop will be held on July 18 -19, 2017, in Rockville, MD.  For additional details and to register please visit the workshop website. Questions about the workshop may be sent to NIHGuidelines@od.nih.gov

We hope you can join us for what is sure to be an exciting and informative event!