Robert Hanson, M.D., M.P.H.

Senior Investigator

Diabetes Epidemiology and Clinical Research Section, Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch

NIDDK

PECRB Building, Room 606
1550 E. Indian School Road
Phoenix, AZ 85014

602-200-5207

rhanson@phx.niddk.nih.gov

Research Topics

Research Goal

The ultimate goal of this research is to understand the causes of diabetes, obesity, and diabetic complications and to understand the molecular processes that lead to these diseases.

Current Research

The Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch conducts research on the causes and correlates of type 2 diabetes, obesity, and diabetic complications.  My research has focused on the epidemiology of these diseases, particularly on genetic and molecular aspects, in American Indian and other populations.  Genetic and non-genetic risk factors for diabetes, obesity, and complications of diabetes are being studied using classical techniques of epidemiology.  The potential genetic causes of these diseases are also studied using the techniques of genetic epidemiology, including studies of variants in DNA in families and in populations. Studies of gene transcription, protein expression, and cellular metabolism are also being pursued.  The branch is studying the effect of lifestyle interventions to promote weight loss on prevention of diabetes and its complications.

Applying our Research

Some of the branch’s research consists of clinical trials that have direct clinical applications. The genomic and molecular research does not have an immediate clinical application, but through this research we hope to gain an understanding of the processes that lead to diabetes and related conditions. Ultimately, we hope that this knowledge will lead to better treatments and preventive strategies for these diseases.

Need for Further Study

The technology for studying the genetic and molecular aspects of diabetes is continuing to improve. The greatest challenges are to develop analytical methods that allow scientists to interpret the results from these technical advances and to ensure that diverse populations are included in genomic and molecular research.

Biography

  • Fellow, Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch, NIDDK, 1991–1993
  • Resident, Preventive Medicine, State University of New York-Stony Brook, 1989–1991
  • Resident, State University of New York-Stony Brook, 1986–1989
  • M.P.H., Columbia University, 1991
  • M.D., University of Kansas, 1986

Selected Publications

  1. Hanson RL, Rong R, Kobes S, Muller YL, Weil EJ, Curtis JM, Nelson RG, Baier LJ. Role of Established Type 2 Diabetes-Susceptibility Genetic Variants in a High Prevalence American Indian Population. Diabetes. 2015;64(7):2646-57.

  2. Hanson RL, Muller YL, Kobes S, Guo T, Bian L, Ossowski V, Wiedrich K, Sutherland J, Wiedrich C, Mahkee D, Huang K, Abdussamad M, Traurig M, Weil EJ, Nelson RG, Bennett PH, Knowler WC, Bogardus C, Baier LJ. A genome-wide association study in American Indians implicates DNER as a susceptibility locus for type 2 diabetes. Diabetes. 2014;63(1):369-76.

  3. Iyengar SK, Sedor JR, Freedman BI, Kao WH, Kretzler M, Keller BJ, Abboud HE, Adler SG, Best LG, Bowden DW, Burlock A, Chen YD, Cole SA, Comeau ME, Curtis JM, Divers J, Drechsler C, Duggirala R, Elston RC, Guo X, Huang H, Hoffmann MM, Howard BV, Ipp E, Kimmel PL, Klag MJ, Knowler WC, Kohn OF, Leak TS, Leehey DJ, Li M, Malhotra A, März W, Nair V, Nelson RG, Nicholas SB, O'Brien SJ, Pahl MV, Parekh RS, Pezzolesi MG, Rasooly RS, Rotimi CN, Rotter JI, Schelling JR, Seldin MF, Shah VO, Smiles AM, Smith MW, Taylor KD, Thameem F, Thornley-Brown DP, Truitt BJ, Wanner C, Weil EJ, Winkler CA, Zager PG, Igo RP Jr, Hanson RL, Langefeld CD, Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND). Genome-Wide Association and Trans-ethnic Meta-Analysis for Advanced Diabetic Kidney Disease: Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND). PLoS Genet. 2015;11(8):e1005352.

  4. Berhane AM, Weil EJ, Knowler WC, Nelson RG, Hanson RL. Albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate as predictors of diabetic end-stage renal disease and death. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2011;6(10):2444-51.

  5. Hanson RL, Guo T, Muller YL, Fleming J, Knowler WC, Kobes S, Bogardus C, Baier LJ. Strong parent-of-origin effects in the association of KCNQ1 variants with type 2 diabetes in American Indians. Diabetes. 2013;62(8):2984-91.


This page was last updated on August 19th, 2016