Jeffrey S. Diamond, Ph.D.

Senior Investigator

Synaptic Physiology Section

NINDS

Building 35A, Room 3E-621
35 Convent Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892-3701

301-435-1896

diamondj@ninds.nih.gov

Biography

Dr. Diamond received his B.S. from Duke University in 1989 and his Ph.D. from the University of California, San Francisco in 1994, where he studied excitatory synaptic transmission in the retina with David Copenhagen. During a postdoctoral fellowship with Craig Jahr at the Vollum Institute, he investigated the effects of glutamate transporters on excitatory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. Dr. Diamond joined NINDS as an investigator in 1999, was awarded the Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering in 2000 and was promoted to Senior Investigator in 2007. His laboratory studies how synapses, neurons and small circuits perform computational tasks required for visual information processing in the mammalian retina.

Selected Publications

  1. Graydon CW, Lieberman EE, Rho N, Briggman KL, Singer JH, Diamond JS. Synaptic Transfer between Rod and Cone Pathways Mediated by AII Amacrine Cells in the Mouse Retina. Curr Biol. 2018;28(17):2739-2751.e3.

  2. Poleg-Polsky A, Ding H, Diamond JS. Functional Compartmentalization within Starburst Amacrine Cell Dendrites in the Retina. Cell Rep. 2018;22(11):2898-2908.

  3. Ding H, Smith RG, Poleg-Polsky A, Diamond JS, Briggman KL. Species-specific wiring for direction selectivity in the mammalian retina. Nature. 2016;535(7610):105-10.

  4. Poleg-Polsky A, Diamond JS. NMDA Receptors Multiplicatively Scale Visual Signals and Enhance Directional Motion Discrimination in Retinal Ganglion Cells. Neuron. 2016;89(6):1277-1290.

  5. Graydon CW, Zhang J, Oesch NW, Sousa AA, Leapman RD, Diamond JS. Passive diffusion as a mechanism underlying ribbon synapse vesicle release and resupply. J Neurosci. 2014;34(27):8948-62.


This page was last updated on February 18th, 2020