Blake Warner, DDS, PhD, MPH

Assistant Clinical Investigator

Salivary Disorders Unit

NIDCR

NIH NIDCR
Building 30 B10 Room 1A08
30 Convent Dr MSC 4340
Bethesda MD 20892-4326

301-496-4486

blake.warner@nih.gov

Research Topics

Blake M. Warner, DDS, PhD, MPH is currently an Assistant Clinical Investigator and Chief of the Salivary Disorders Unit and the Sjögren’s Syndrome Clinic. The integrated specialty clinic and associated laboratory focus on characterizing disorders affecting the salivary glands including autoimmune diseases and iatrogenic salivary damage by oncologic therapies. Specifically, we interrogate the clinical phenotype, genetics, and immunopathology of salivary dysfunction states including SS and immune checkpoint inhibitor-induced (ICI) sicca and to inform the clinical testing novel therapeutics to improve health outcomes.

Presently, the Salivary Disorders Unit is pursuing two focused research projects: i) investigating pathogenic T cell subsets in Sjögren’s Syndrome and immune checkpoint inhibitor sicca (ICIS, Warner et al., 2019, Burbelo et al., 2019), and ii) the identification of novel mechanisms of salivary dysregulation in genetic forms of Sjögren’s Syndrome. The laboratory uses patient-derived tissues to perform integrated tissue investigations using single cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) and spatially-resolved RNA-seq (srRNA-seq) and robust clinical data to understand transcriptional state of each salivary cell type. The second aim is to identify unique subsets patients which phenocopy SS but with variants in pathways central to salivary function, or in genes that modify the development of autoimmunity. In studying rare disease variants, we open a window into the biology of complex autoimmune diseases.

Biography

Dr. Blake M. Warner received his B.S. in Biochemistry at the University of Miami in Oxford, OH, his M.P.H., Ph.D., and D.D.S. at The Ohio State University. Dr. Warner subsequently completed a three-year hospital-based clinical residency in Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and earned his Fellowship in the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology and his Board Certification by the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology in 2017. Dr. Warner then completed a post-doctoral Clinical Research Fellowship at NIDCR focused on basic and clinical investigations in Sjögren’s Syndrome and radiation-induced xerostomia. In May of 2018, Dr. Warner was appointed acting chief of the Sjögren’s Syndrome Clinic and in August of 2019 was appointed Chief of the Salivary Disorders Unit and the Sjögren’s Syndrome Clinic. He leads an integrated multi-specialty clinic and aligned research laboratory focused on deep characterization of disorders affecting the salivary glands including autoimmune diseases and iatrogenic salivary damage by oncologic therapies. Specifically, we interrogate the clinical phenotype, genetics, and immunopathology of salivary dysfunction states including SS and immune checkpoint inhibitor-induced (ICI) sicca and to inform the clinical testing novel therapeutics to improve health outcomes.

Selected Publications

  1. Burbelo PD, Ferré EMN, Chaturvedi A, Chiorini JA, Alevizos I, Lionakis MS, Warner BM. Profiling Autoantibodies against Salivary Proteins in Sicca Conditions. J Dent Res. 2019;98(7):772-778.

  2. Warner BM, Baer AN, Lipson EJ, Allen C, Hinrichs C, Rajan A, Pelayo E, Beach M, Gulley JL, Madan RA, Feliciano J, Grisius M, Long L, Powers A, Kleiner DE, Cappelli L, Alevizos I. Sicca Syndrome Associated with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy. Oncologist. 2019;24(9):1259-1269.

  3. Yin H, Kalra L, Lai Z, Guimaro MC, Aber L, Warner BM, Michael D, Zhang N, Cabrera-Perez J, Karim A, Swaim WD, Afione S, Voigt A, Nguyen CQ, Yu PB, Bloch DB, Chiorini JA. Inhibition of bone morphogenetic protein 6 receptors ameliorates Sjögren's syndrome in mice. Sci Rep. 2020;10(1):2967.

  4. Roy J, Warner BM, Basuli F, Zhang X, Wong K, Pranzatelli T, Ton AT, Chiorini JA, Choyke PL, Lin FI, Jagoda EM. Comparison of Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Expression Levels in Human Salivary Glands to Non-Human Primates and Rodents. Cancer Biother Radiopharm. 2020;35(4):284-291.

  5. Cortes-Troncoso J, Jang SI, Perez P, Hidalgo J, Ikeuchi T, Greenwell-Wild T, Warner BM, Moutsopoulos NM, Alevizos I. T cell exosome-derived miR-142-3p impairs glandular cell function in Sjögren's syndrome. JCI Insight. 2020;5(9).


This page was last updated on September 16th, 2020