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Events

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) campuses host a variety of events that inform, challenge, and unite the biomedical research community. IRP investigators lead or participate in many of these events, and they regularly present their work at scientific conferences at the NIH and around the world. We invite you to learn about (and possibly join us in) some of our upcoming events. Unless otherwise noted, times listed are Eastern Standard Time (EST).

Tuesday, February 9, 2016, 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm

Conference Room, Bldg 50

The next Demystifying Medicine course is “The Intestinal Microbiome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease” by Yasmine Belkaid, PhD (NIAID) and Warren Strober, MD (NIAID). Course materials are posted at https://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.gov. Note: materials may not be available until a week before the lecture. No registration is needed if not for credit.

The 2015 Demystifying Medicine Series, which is jointly sponsored by FAES and NIH, includes the presentation of patients, pathology, diagnosis and therapy in the context of major disease problems and current research.  Primarily directed toward Ph.D. students, clinicians and program managers, the course is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their application to major human diseases. Each session includes clinical and basic science components presented by NIH staff and invitees. All students, fellows and staff are welcome, as well. See full schedule at http://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.gov.

Wednesday, February 10, 2016, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm (reception to follow)

Masur Auditorium, NIH Clinical Center (Bldg 10)

Join us for WALS with Linda Griffith, Ph.D., Professor of Biological and Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The lecture is titled,"Move Over, Mice: How the fusion of system biology with 'organs on chips' may humanize drug development".

   

From the speaker: Our research encompasses molecular-to-systems level analysis, design and synthesis of biomaterials, scaffolds, devices and micro-organs for a range of applications in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and drug development. A central theme is connecting the experimental systems to systems biology measurements. Most projects are highly interdisciplinary and translational, involving basic scientists, clinicians, and engineers, often with industry partners, to solve important problems in medicine and biology. The lab is affiliated with the Center for Gynepathology Research (CGR) at MIT.

Come join your colleagues, DDIR Michael Gottesman and NIH Director Francis Collins at these top-notch lectures, even if you think they are outside of your area of interest. The Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series is this highest-profile scientific lecture series at the NIH, created to keep the NIH community informed of the latest world-class science. Speakers are nominated by NIH scientific staff. Receptions with the speaker supported by our lecture partner, FAES, follow each lecture. The full 2015–2016 schedule is posted at http://oir.nih.gov/wals

Thursday, February 11, 2016, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm

Balcony C, Natcher Conference Center (Bldg 45)

The Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Lecture Series continues with a lectured titled “To Tweet or Not to Tweet: Community-based Participatory Research Approaches to Advance Wellness and Violence Prevention via Social Media” by Ann Marie White, Ph.D., University of Rochester Medical Center, and Melanie Funchess, Director, Mental Health Association.

Many health-related concerns due the interplay of community members’ social media and geographical uses exist. However, rapid deployment of massive amounts of social media data and big data analytic tools for sensing can also become a health intervention aid for local communities. We examine this dynamic interplay through a focus on natural helpers, individuals who others routinely turn to for help and support, and whose efforts can reduce violence risks and promote mental health and wellness in local communities. During this presentation, we will describe how a community can begin to develop and deploy its own sensing methods for health-related content signals in its social media use through academic-community partnered research. We will present emerging community-based participatory research on the social media presence of informal helping exchange networks and the relationship to signals of wellness and violence prevention in communities. We draw upon longitudinal Twitter social media network data from a multiple county region surrounding a small and diverse urban area of New York State. These data demonstrate that Twitter users (nodes) with greater centrality in sub-networks of gratefulness (mutual thanking exchanges on Twitter) generate more socially beneficial social media content such as positive sentiment that can enrich social cohesion in communities. We will explore how to build an academic-community research partnership that can both sense health risks in social media (e.g., alcohol use mentions) while locating and mobilizing helping networks in communities, in order to better identify where quality of life and wellness is robust and to spread community-building initiatives that reinforce social cohesion and reduce observable risks for violence.

Thursday, February 11, 2016, 4:00 pm

Lipsett Amphitheatre, NIH Clinical Center (Bldg 10)

Stem cell biologist Dennis Clegg, Ph.D., will present “Vision for the Future: Cell Therapy for Ocular Disease,” as part of the NEI’s Audacious Goals Initiative (AGI) Seminar Series in Neuroregeneration.

Clegg is a professor at the University of California Santa Barbara Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology. He is also founder and co-director at the UCSB Center for Stem Cell Biology and Engineering and a co-principal investigator of the California Project to Cure Blindness. His research centers on neural development and regeneration with a focus on stem cell therapies for eye disease. Clegg has served on advisory boards for the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the NIH Center for Regenerative Medicine. The AGI series explores topics relevant to regenerative neuroscience and medicine, with special emphasis on the visual system. The AGI is a sustained effort by NEI to catalyze research toward new therapies for disorders that affect the retina and its connections to the brain. More information is posted at https://nei.nih.gov/audacious/seminar_series_neuroregeneration.

Tuesday, February 16, 2016, 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm

Conference Room, Bldg 50

The next Demystifying Medicine course is “The Oral Microbiome Meets Cell Biology and Periodontal Disease” by Niki Moutsopoulos, Ph.D. (NIDCR), Robert Palmer, Ph.D. (NIDCR), and Alex Valm, Ph.D. (NICHD). Course materials are posted at https://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.gov. Note: materials may not be available until a week before the lecture. No registration is needed if not for credit.

The 2015 Demystifying Medicine Series, which is jointly sponsored by FAES and NIH, includes the presentation of patients, pathology, diagnosis and therapy in the context of major disease problems and current research.  Primarily directed toward Ph.D. students, clinicians and program managers, the course is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their application to major human diseases. Each session includes clinical and basic science components presented by NIH staff and invitees. All students, fellows and staff are welcome, as well. See full schedule at http://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.gov.

Wednesday, February 17, 2016, 9:30 am to 11:00 am

Lipsett Amphitheatre, NIH Clinical Center (Bldg 10)

Join us for the first lecture in the Current Topics in Genome Analysis series, "Biological Sequence Analysis I" with Andy Baxevanis, Ph.D., Head of the Computational Genomics Unit, Director of the Bioinformatics and Scientific Programming Core and Associate Investigator at NHGRI. 

The scientific community celebrated the achievement of the Human Genome Project's major goal in April of 2003: completion of a high-accuracy sequence of the human genome. The significance of this milestone cannot be underestimated, as it firmly marks the entrance of modern biology into the genomic era (and not the post-genomic era, as many have stated). The intelligent use of sequence data from human and other organisms, along with technological innovations fostered by the Human Genome Project, will lead to significant advances in our understanding of diseases that have a genetic basis and, more importantly, in how health care is delivered in the future.

Given the rapid advances in genomics and bioinformatics that have taken place in the past few years, an intensive review of the major areas of ongoing genome research would be of great value to our fellow National Institutes of Health investigators. To that end, the National Human Genome Research Institute is pleased to once again sponsor the Current Topics in Genome Analysis lecture series.

The series consists of 14 lectures on successive Wednesdays, with a mixture of local and outside speakers covering the major areas of genomics. In this 12th edition of the series, rather than splitting the lectures into "laboratory-based" and "computationally-based" blocks, we have intermingled the lectures by general subject area. We hope that this approach conveys the idea that both laboratory- and computationally-based approaches are necessary in order to do cutting-edge biological research in the future.

The lectures are geared at the level of first year graduate students, are practical in nature, and are intended for a diverse audience. Handouts will be provided for each lecture, and time will be available at the end of each lecture for questions and discussion.

Wednesday, February 17, 2016, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm (reception to follow)

Masur Auditorium, NIH Clinical Center (Bldg 10)

Join us for WALS with Katie Hinde, Ph.D., an Associate Professor at Harvard University as she presents,"Why mammals suck: the food, medicine and signal of mother’s milk".

Mother’s milk has an organizational effect on infant outcomes, not just by providing the energy that sustains growth, but by transferring bioactives that influence immunological, neurobiological, microbial, neurobiological and behavioral development. Guided by evolutionary theory, Dr. Hinde investigates how variation in mother’s milk influences infant outcomes from post-natal life into adulthood and subsequent generations.

Come join your colleagues, DDIR Michael Gottesman and NIH Director Francis Collins at these top-notch lectures, even if you think they are outside of your area of interest.  The Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series is this highest-profile scientific lecture series at the NIH, created to keep the NIH community informed of the latest world-class science.  Speakers are nominated by NIH scientific staff.  Receptions with the speaker supported by our lecture partner, FAES, follow each lecture. The full 2015–2016 schedule is posted at http://oir.nih.gov/wals.

Tuesday, February 23, 2016, 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm

Conference Room, Bldg 50

The next Demystifying Medicine course is “Atopy: The Common and The Rare Allergies in the Genomic Era” by Joshua Milner, M.D. (NIAID) and Pamela Guerrerio, M.D. Ph.D. (NIAID). Course materials are posted at https://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.gov. Note: materials may not be available until a week before the lecture. No registration is needed if not for credit.

The 2015 Demystifying Medicine Series, which is jointly sponsored by FAES and NIH, includes the presentation of patients, pathology, diagnosis and therapy in the context of major disease problems and current research.  Primarily directed toward Ph.D. students, clinicians and program managers, the course is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their application to major human diseases. Each session includes clinical and basic science components presented by NIH staff and invitees. All students, fellows and staff are welcome, as well. See full schedule at http://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.gov.

Friday, February 26, 2016, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Wilson Hall (Bldg 1), 3rd Floor

Join us as Dr. Elissa Lei, Ph.D., of NIDDK presents "RNA-dependent chromatin insulator function" as part of the 2015-2016 Director’s Seminar Series. The speakers of this series are stellar, recently tenured Senior Investigators. For queries, please contact the Office of Intramural Research, OD, NIH at (301) 496-1921.

Monday, February 29, 2016, 8:30 am to 3:30 pm

Masur Auditorium, NIH Clinical Center (Bldg 10)

Rare Disease Day takes place worldwide on the last day in February to raise awareness among policymakers and the public about rare diseases and their impact on patients’ lives. Each year, NCATS and the NIH Clinical Center sponsor Rare Disease Day at NIH as part of this global observance. Register here: https://events-support.com/events/NIH_Rare_Disease_Day

Featured Activities: NIH Clinical Center tours, posters, exhibits, art show and presentations

Sponsors: NCATS and NIH Clinical Center

Partners: Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Orphan Product Development and Center for Drug Evaluation and Research’s Rare Disease Program, National Organization for Rare Disorders, Genetic Alliance, Global Genes, EveryLife Foundation for Rare Diseases, and Uplifting Athletes.

Thursday, March 10, 2016, 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm

NLM Lister Hill Auditorium, Bldg 38

The NLM presents “Future Historical Collections: Archiving the 2014 Ebola Outbreak,” by Christie Moffatt, Archivist & Manager, Digital Manuscripts Program, National Library of Medicine, on March 10 from 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. in the NLM Lister Hill Auditorium, Building 38A.  When future researchers look back at the recent Ebola outbreak, what resources will they want to explore? What will they want to know? Of the news and information about Ebola that is still being created and shared digitally over the web, what will remain to be examined one, ten, or even fifty years from now? Public health information, first hand experiences, and news about global health events like Ebola are shared moment by moment on websites, blogs, Twitter, YouTube, and more, documenting the personal, national, and international response to the outbreak. This content about the human experience of disease remains in a constant state of change and at high risk for loss. The original intent of these resources is to share news and information—and reaction to this news and information—about the crisis in real time, but it is also likely that this content will have enduring value as historical resources for the future study and understanding of the 2014 Ebola outbreak.

This presentation will spotlight the development of the National Library of Medicine’s Ebola web archive collection, which has grown since October 2014 when the library took the initiative to capture and preserve selected born-digital web content documenting the 2014 Ebola outbreak. The collection reflects a diversity of perspectives on this health crisis and includes websites and social media from Government and non-government organizations, journalists, healthcare workers, and scientists in the United States and around the world. The presentation will cover how Library staff selected this content and continues to grow the collection, how the collection fits within NLM’s larger web archiving efforts and collection development policy, and how this collecting effort overall advances the objectives of the National Digital Stewardship Alliance, of which the Library is a partner.

Friday, March 11, 2016, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Wilson Hall (Bldg 1), 3rd Floor

Join us as Vipul Periwal, Ph.D., of NIDDK presents "Predicting the incidence of cancer: Does natural selection pick holographic networks?" as part of the 2015-2016 Director’s Seminar Series. The speakers of this series are stellar, recently tenured Senior Investigators. For queries, please contact the Office of Intramural Research, OD, NIH at (301) 496-1921.

Monday, March 14, 2016

Lipsett Auditorium, NIH Clinical Center (Bldg 10) / FAES Terrace

The NIH will hold its second annual Pi Day Celebration on Pi Day, March 14 — that’s 3/14. The goal of the NIH Pi Day celebration is to increase awareness across the biomedical science community of the role that the quantitative sciences play in biomedical science. NIH staff will have the opportunity to give short presentations called “PiCo Talks” or posters/demos. (PiCo talks are meant to last 3.14 minutes.) If you want to share information about an interesting project or idea related to the role of the quantitative sciences in the biomedical sciences, please register for a talk or poster/demo. Space is limited, so register early, but no later than January 29. Selected posters and PiCo talks will be notified by February 15.

Pi Day will be full of events on the NIH campuses, including a keynote address by Dr. Carlos Bustamante, the chair of Stanford’s new Biomedical Data Science Department. His department works to find common solutions to the challenges of analyzing biomedical data from varied sources, including biosensors, electronic medical records and genomic sequencing. Pi Day at NIH is hosted and organized by the NIH Office of the Director (Office of the Associate Director for Data Science, the National Institutes of Health Library, and the Office of Intramural Research) along with all ICs. If you/your IC would like to organize a new Pi Day event for the NIH community, contact Michelle Dunn in the NIH/OD ADDS Office. Join the Pi Day conversation – include #NIH_PiDay in your tweets. For the full schedule or to register for a PiCo talk or demo, visit https://datascience.nih.gov/PiDay2016

Tuesday, March 22, 2016 to Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Natcher Conference Center (Bldg 45)

Marijuana and Cannabinoids: A Neuroscience Research Summit is being convened by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which will focus on the neurological and psychiatric effects of marijuana, other cannabinoids, and the endocannabinoid system. Both the adverse and the potential therapeutic effects of the cannabinoid system will be discussed. The goal of this summit is to ensure evidence-based information is available to inform practice and policy, particularly important at this time given the rapidly shifting landscape regarding the recreational and medicinal use of marijuana. The meeting is being sponsored by several NIH Institutes and Centers: the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA); the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA); the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH); the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH); and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). The event will be held on March 22-23 at the Natcher Conference Center on the NIH campus in Bethesda, Maryland. 

Friday, April 22, 2016, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Wilson Hall (Bldg 1), 3rd Floor

Join us as Michele Evans, M.D., of NIA presents "Pursuing health disparities from the neighborhood to the bench: The view from Baltimore" as part of the 2015-2016 Director’s Seminar Series. The speakers of this series are stellar, recently tenured Senior Investigators. For queries, please contact the Office of Intramural Research, OD, NIH at (301) 496-1921.

Friday, May 20, 2016, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Wilson Hall (Bldg 1), 3rd Floor

Join us as Charles Venditti, M.D., Ph.D., of NHGRI presents "Vitamin B12 metabolism gone awry: Pathways, diseases and therapies" as part of the 2015-2016 Director’s Seminar Series. The speakers of this series are stellar, recently tenured Senior Investigators. For queries, please contact the Office of Intramural Research, OD, NIH at (301) 496-1921.

Friday, June 3, 2016, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Wilson Hall (Bldg 1), 3rd Floor

Join us as Deborah Citrin, M.D., of NCI presents "Novel concepts in radiation-induced normal tissue injury" as part of the 2015-2016 Director’s Seminar Series. The speakers of this series are stellar, recently tenured Senior Investigators. For queries, please contact the Office of Intramural Research, OD, NIH at (301) 496-1921.