Hari Shroff, Ph.D.

Senior Investigator

Section on High Resolution Optical Imaging

NIBIB

Building 13, Room G800
13 South Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892

301-435-1995

hari.shroff@nih.gov

Research Topics

  • Development of new imaging tools to study fast 3D cellular processes
  • Super-resolution microscopy
  • Cell motility
  • Single molecule fluorescence
  • Physical properties of highly-bent DNA molecules

    Biography

    Dr. Hari Shroff received a B.S.E. in bioengineering from the University of Washington in 2001, and under the supervision of Dr. Jan Liphardt, completed his Ph.D. in biophysics at the University of California at Berkeley in 2006. He spent the next three years performing postdoctoral research under the mentorship of Eric Betzig at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Farm Research Campus where his research focused on development of photactivated localization microscopy (PALM), an optical superresolution technique. Dr. Shroff is now Chief of NIBIB's section on high resolution optical imaging laboratory, where he and his staff are developing new imaging tools for application in biological and clinical research.

    Selected Publications

    1. York AG, Parekh SH, Dalle Nogare D, Fischer RS, Temprine K, Mione M, Chitnis AB, Combs CA, Shroff H. Resolution doubling in live, multicellular organisms via multifocal structured illumination microscopy. Nat Methods. 2012;9(7):749-54.

    2. York AG, Chandris P, Nogare DD, Head J, Wawrzusin P, Fischer RS, Chitnis A, Shroff H. Instant super-resolution imaging in live cells and embryos via analog image processing. Nat Methods. 2013;10(11):1122-6.

    3. Winter PW, York AG, Nogare DD, Ingaramo M, Christensen R, Chitnis A, Patterson GH, Shroff H. Two-photon instant structured illumination microscopy improves the depth penetration of super-resolution imaging in thick scattering samples. Optica. 2014;1(3):181-191.

    4. Wu Y, Ghitani A, Christensen R, Santella A, Du Z, Rondeau G, Bao Z, Colón-Ramos D, Shroff H. Inverted selective plane illumination microscopy (iSPIM) enables coupled cell identity lineaging and neurodevelopmental imaging in Caenorhabditis elegans. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011;108(43):17708-13.


    This page was last updated on July 16th, 2012