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Kenneth H. Fischbeck, M.D.

NIH Distinguished Investigator
Neurogenetics Branch
NINDS
Building 35, Room 2A-1000
35 Convent Drive
Bethesda, MD 20892
301-435-9318

Research Topics

The purpose of the Neurogenetics Branch is to investigate the causes of hereditary neurological diseases, with the goal of developing effective treatments for these disorders. Particular areas of research interest in the Fischbeck lab include the polyglutamine expansion diseases (Huntington's disease, Kennedy's disease, and spinocerebellar ataxia), spinal muscular atrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, muscular dystrophy, hereditary motor neuron disease, and Friedreich's ataxia. A genetic outreach program is intended to identify and characterize patients and families with hereditary neurological diseases. The disease mechanisms are studied and potential treatments are evaluated in cell culture and other model systems. A trial of dutasteride treatment for Kennedy's disease was recently completed, and other clinical trials for Kennedy's disease and Duchenne muscular dystrophy are in progress. Efforts are also currently underway to develop new treatments for spinal muscular atrophy.

Biography

Dr. Fischbeck received A.B. and A.M. degrees from Harvard University and an M.D. degree from Johns Hopkins. After a medical internship at Case Western Reserve University and a neurology residency at the University of California in San Francisco, he did postdoctoral research on muscular dystrophy at the University of Pennsylvania. In 1982 he joined the faculty in the Neurology Department at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. In 1998 he came to the NINDS as Chief of the Neurogenetics Branch. He received the Cotzias Award from the American Academy of Neurology and the Jacoby Award from the American Neurological Association, and he was elected to the Institute of Medicine. His research group is identifying the causes and studying the mechanisms of hereditary neurological and neuromuscular diseases with the goal of developing effective treatment for these disorders.

Selected Publications

  1. Motley WW, Seburn KL, Nawaz MH, Miers KE, Cheng J, Antonellis A, Green ED, Talbot K, Yang XL, Fischbeck KH, Burgess RW. Charcot-Marie-Tooth-linked mutant GARS is toxic to peripheral neurons independent of wild-type GARS levels. PLoS Genet. 2011;7(12):e1002399.
  2. Fernández-Rhodes LE, Kokkinis AD, White MJ, Watts CA, Auh S, Jeffries NO, Shrader JA, Lehky TJ, Li L, Ryder JE, Levy EW, Solomon BI, Harris-Love MO, La Pean A, Schindler AB, Chen C, Di Prospero NA, Fischbeck KH. Efficacy and safety of dutasteride in patients with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy: a randomised placebo-controlled trial. Lancet Neurol. 2011;10(2):140-7.
  3. Kwon DY, Motley WW, Fischbeck KH, Burnett BG. Increasing expression and decreasing degradation of SMN ameliorate the spinal muscular atrophy phenotype in mice. Hum Mol Genet. 2011;20(18):3667-77.
  4. Palazzolo I, Nedelsky NB, Askew CE, Harmison GG, Kasantsev AG, Taylor JP, Fischbeck KH, Pennuto M. B2 attenuates polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor toxicity in cell and fly models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. J Neurosci Res. 2010;88(10):2207-16.
  5. Meilleur KG, Traoré M, Sangaré M, Britton A, Landouré G, Coulibaly S, Niaré B, Mochel F, La Pean A, Rafferty I, Watts C, Shriner D, Littleton-Kearney MT, Blackstone C, Singleton A, Fischbeck KH. Hereditary spastic paraplegia and amyotrophy associated with a novel locus on chromosome 19. Neurogenetics. 2010;11(3):313-8.
This page was last updated on January 11th, 2012